Corporate Golf Trends
Since food is a commonality that all guests share, the face of catering at golf events has grown increasingly more sophisticated. A light lunch is no longer enough to produce a good impression. Most events include a hearty lunch, usually consisting of barbeque and hamburgers, and a buffet-style dinner.

Should a planner be concerned that the food might take away attention from the main event? That shouldn’t be a problem. Chances are there will be guests who show up without the intention of picking up a golf club. In fact, organizers are now embracing this “no play” factor. One should keep in mind that the ultimate purpose of a golf outing, as with any corporate event, is to improve business in the future. If only golfers are invited and attention paid to guests solely on the field, the possibilities for networking are diminished by a wide margin. To maximize the number of people who will be reached by this event, invitations may be sent specifically in support of the dinner. Providing an open bar and making note of that on the invitation will likely draw VIPs uninterested in golf. The invitation should also note any other activities or special features so as to generate as much interest as possible.

In-House Events
So far it’s been established that a successful golf outing is dependent on guest selection, an understanding of the attending audience, and putting out the best presentation possible. It’s understandable that so much work would go into a production that seeks to impress future business partners, investors, and the local media. But would anyone ever consider putting on such a show for one’s own employees? Ten years ago such an expense on behalf of people who already work for you was unthinkable. That was until research analysts found that the workplace had become a place of growing tension and frustration in large part due to a lack of interaction between employees outside of business.

Golf is now becoming a middle ground where employees and employer can spend at least one day of the year outside of the office in a relaxing atmosphere. Golf outings are a great way to reach the goals of team building. Spending time together in recreational activities builds camaraderie between workers and reminds them that they are teammates and not competitors. An employer enjoying the day with his staff goes a long way in building loyalty among his/her employees. The benefits of personal interaction extend beyond a simple day of fun. Research has shown that corporate production increases when there is a bond of trust in the workplace. Granted, golf doesn’t make a person more competent at their job, but it certainly builds company unity which can make team projects run more smoothly and effectively.

Organizing a company golf event is the perfect way to show that everyone is valued at an individual level and what they each bring to the table is important. Make the day an annual tradition, one the team can look forward to and one you can too.


   
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